Tag Archives: CRM

Rewarding Member Loyalty: Effective schemes that encourage retention

26 November 2018 openplay Leave a comment Booking System, Memberships, Technology

From British Airways to Benugo, companies large and small are incentivising their customers with rewards. When it comes to exercising and staying on track, humans often need an extra little nudge.

You might be inclined to cut back on rewards when finances are tight, but customer loyalty programmes pay for themselves and then some. Rewarding member loyalty is, in fact, a carefully constructed marketing ploy- upselling in disguise.

An effective loyalty programme will increase member activity, improve customer experience, and increase revenue for your business.

Opt for a points-based system

One of the most popular choices is a points-based system. Customers recognise this model from coffee chains and supermarkets, so they find it easy to understand. Points accumulate each time a customer attends the gym, takes a class, or executes a faultless burpee (we’re working on the tech for that one).

Small rewards should be reachable within a week of consistent training. More substantial rewards need to be attainable within a three-month period for clients to find them worthwhile.

Types of rewards

The value of the prizes you offer needs to be carefully balanced with your own goals. When the scales are level, both you and your customer will benefit.

Offer rewards on a sliding scale. Small prizes could include free hot drinks, smoothies, advance booking, a hand towel or gym lock. At the higher end of the spectrum are free classes or a PT session.

The trick is to merge rewards with services or products you are hoping to promote.

Big awards for referrals

A real sign of loyalty is when a member brings in a new customer. A member referral could bring in hundreds of pounds to your health club, so members should be rewarded highly, perhaps with a free class of their choice or a significant discount from a month of their fee.

The equivalent of £30-£50 is a reasonable premium for referrals.

Integrate rewards with your CRM system

To make this a win-win model, integrate your loyalty programme with your Customer Relationship Management (CRM) technology.

A CRM system keeps track of your customers’ interactions with your business, so you can observe their activity levels and, more importantly, the aspects of your business they do not yet take advantage of. You might choose to offer rewards that encourage clients to greater experience your service.

For example, someone who is a Hiit fanatic could be awarded a free holistic class. Someone whose attendance has slipped could be offered a free PT session, to reinvigorate their interest and decrease the likelihood of them abandoning the club.

To find out more about how CRM systems work check out this article… CRM- A complete guide

Enhance the experience

Companies that truly understand customer loyalty take their strategy a step further and create a more convenient experience. Often this is done through the development of an app.

Many airlines provide apps that allow customers to check in online and bypass airport queues. The Wetherspoons app lets people order drinks from their table, meaning they are relieved from elbow bashing at the bar. A customer’s activity is tracked through the app, meaning further rewards can be dished out directly to their phone.

When businesses solve client problems and alleviate pain points, customer loyalty rises.

Re-evaluate and evolve

Any new strategy will take time before it is beneficial. Your system will require lots of remodelling as you get to grips with the desires of your customers. You can measure the success of your loyalty programme by monitoring member retention and satisfaction.

Tags: , , , ,

Like this article? there’s more where that came from.

How to increase member retention: A guide for sports centres, gyms and studios

7 August 2018 openplay Leave a comment Booking System, Memberships

It’s the same every year; January sees a flock of eager Christmas-pudding shifters clog up the gym as they attempt to do sit-ups on the leg curl machine. But most of these blow-ins are nowhere to be seen come February. Gyms must work harder to motivate and retain these well-intentioned newbies if they want to keep their membership numbers up.

Redundant memberships are more common than active ones. The less a member uses your facilities, the less likely they are to renew their membership. For every additional visit a person makes each month, their risk of cancellation reduces by 33%.

So how can you increase member retention? The answer is surprisingly simple: communication and engagement.

Reward member loyalty

Your longtime members are most likely to become dissatisfied with your service. To combat this, consider offering a point-style loyalty system where people earn a free smoothie after five visits or free personal training session after 20 visits. Reward them with extra guest passes, which, in turn, could gift you with new members.

Implement a CRM system

Customer relationship management (CRM) software is booming in the technology world and beyond. CRM is usually stored in the cloud, where it records, reports, and analyses each interaction between a business and its customers. When you understand your customers; remember their previous requests, their birthday, and their goals with you, they feel valued. Your CRM system is built into your OpenPlay account, so you can access a customer’s details and discover their relationship with you directly from your OpenPlay dashboard.

Curious? Learn more: CRM- A complete guide

Promote PT and group classes

It is not the swanky heated pool or treadmills with Sky Tv that will keep the bulk of your members coming back; human interaction will. People are socially motivated. Whether it’s a group fitness class, where friends can work out together, or a personal trainer who will scream at clients for missing a session, humans need to be involved.

Challenge cycles

Make every second month the “January rush”. Host a ‘30-day Challenge,’ where people compete to complete the highest number of workouts in 30 days. Introduce a leadership board and get your staff to promote the competition or even join it. These competitive events will keep customers engaged and help them achieve their exercise goals.

Reach out to inactive members

Using your CRM system, you can track member activity. Send polite, motivational emails to those who have been absent for a few weeks. Recommend your favourite upcoming classes, Attaching workout tips and remind members that your staff are always around to help with any questions or concerns.

Staff engagement

To keep members engaged, you need your facilities to feel like a community. A hello is free, and a smile costs nothing, so make sure that every employee is friendly and forthcoming. Wherever possible, learn clients’ names, and use them. Staff should be extra accommodating with new members- yes, the January mob! Show them how to use equipment, recommend appropriate classes, and welcome them into the community.

Question: What tactics have you used to increase member retention?

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Like this article? there’s more where that came from.

Does my fitness business need an app?

24 July 2018 openplay Leave a comment Booking System

On the storage-challenged iPhone, gigabytes are a precious commodity. Apps are clogging up users’ phones, meaning that they are quickly binned if not a priority. Before you decide to become one of over 2.2 million apps fighting for attention in the App Store and one of 3.5 million in the Google Play store, take a look at the pros and cons of building an app for your business. Here are six questions you should ask yourself before investing in an app.

1) Is my website complete?

Before you even begin to consider an app, make sure that your website is fully functional, user-friendly, and mobile responsive. Nowadays it is essential that your site can be viewed easily on a mobile device. This does not immediately constitute the need for an app. Mobile view is not merely a smaller version of a desktop screen (we have all experienced trying to zoom in on a page that is A2 sized) but one that is enriched by the compactness of a smaller screen. Corner drop-down menus, scrollable content, and thumbable links are essential for a mobile website. Google now punishes sites that do not adapt to mobile by demoting them in search rankings.

2) How many power users do I have?

Your website reels in new customers. Your app retains them. If someone downloads your app, they have sacrificed someone else’s app, or deleted an Oasis album, or erased their family Whatsapp group; they are a loyal, heroic customer. You need to determine the number of power patrons you have. If you are a studio with mostly drop-ins and casual users, your app will get little attention. Membership clubs, on the other hand, can create an app that enhances the customer’s experience by soothing pain points and offering quick booking, easy access to timetables, and premium features.

3) Are push notifications useful for us?

Push notifications are a bit like emails, except they pop up on your phone and are sent directly from an app. They aim to increase engagement and to market new products or updates. Push can also remind a user to complete an abandoned purchase or to come back to the gym: “We haven’t seen you in Spin for a while.” While Push is a great marketing tool, it is not a million miles away from email alerts so that the system could be applied to your email marketing strategy instead. The advantage of push is that the notifications do not get boxed away in promotions or junk folders.

4) What pain points will my app solve? What extras will it offer?

An app is all about customer ease. At a sports club or gym, an app will eliminate the need for customer loyalty cards and membership zappers- as digital barcodes become the new access control. Your app should streamline the customer experience, keeping members up-to-speed with their fitness progress, purchase history, and upcoming appointments. Having this toolkit of information and services in a single app will increase member satisfaction.

Gymgoers will be able to view and book classes straight from the app. Afterwards, a pop-up feedback form gives them a chance to rate the experience, showing that you value and listen to their views.

In-app purchases are convenient for customers and valuable to you. Perhaps clients can pre-order a smoothie via your app, so it is ready and waiting for them when they finish their workout.

5) Do I have a customer loyalty programme?

Member retention is directly correlated to facility usage and business engagement, so an interactive and personable loyalty scheme is highly advantageous for any fitness business. For your app to maximise retention, you should integrate it with your customer loyalty programme. Your app will track a client’s fitness journey, offering rewards based on the number of classes they take, sweat buckets they fill, or burpees they bust. Your duty to your customers is to help them achieve their health and fitness goals so that they will appreciate push notifications and motivational rewards.

6) Do my competitors have apps?

It is always a good idea to suss out the competition. Download a competitor’s app for yourself and have a play around. Check out the number of downloads and the user reviews to see how popular and successful the project has been. If it looks like their app has received little attention and is full of bugs, then perhaps it is a sign that your market isn’t ready and a business of your size cannot afford a high-quality app.

7) Is it worth it?

Many of the big chain facilities have invested hundreds of thousands of pounds into developing half-baked apps. Unless you have a faithful customer base and plentiful resources to build a highly useful app, don’t bother. On average, for a fairly basic, well-designed app, agency fees will cost between £50,000 and £100,000. The larger app companies demand an extra zero on the end of those two figures. An app is not a requirement for fitness facilities at the moment, although this is likely to change in the future.

Tags: , , ,

Like this article? there’s more where that came from.

Customer Relationship Management (CRM): What is it and do you need a system in place?

27 June 2018 openplay Leave a comment Analytics, Booking System, Marketing, Memberships, Operations, Technology

In 2018, customer relationship management (CRM) software became the leading and fastest growing software market, with a growth rate of 16%, according to research by Gartner. Worldwide, CRM software revenue reached $39.5 billion at the end of 2017, surpassing that of database management systems (DBMS). With such rapid growth, people have been given little time to get their heads around what CRM actually is. Many people use the word, sounding impressive in emails and board meetings, but frequently they confuse its meaning with more general management software. So, what exactly is CRM and should your wellbeing business use one of these highly complex systems?

What is it?

Simply put, CRM is a way to manage and improve your interactions with customers and potential customers. Sometimes it refers to a company’s theoretical strategy or process. In its most recent format, it is a software product, usually stored in the cloud, that records, reports and analyses every interaction between company and customer. It sounds very Big Brother, but it is intended to serve both the service provider and the consumer.

The Benefits of CRM

  1. Personalised marketing: CRM allows for a more personalised approach to marketing. Think of targeted ads that follow you around the internet; CRM refines this personalisation further. Customers or potential customers are only advertised to about products or events that are highly relevant to their interests.
  2. Automated sales: Salespeople cannot afford to waste time rooting through spreadsheets and notepads to remember their relationship with a customer. CRM puts this information directly onto their dashboard allowing for a much smoother and more effective pitch.
  3. Higher retention: It is proven that retention rates and member usage are directly correlated. For each additional visit by a member in any given month, the risk of that member cancelling in the subsequent month is reduced by 33%, according to research by IHRSA. With a fitness CRM system, you can monitor and reach out to inactive members who are most vulnerable to cancellation.
  4. Customers feel valued: A mother might call with a query about her daughter’s tennis group. With an efficient sports CRM system, you can quickly search her name and load every previous interaction. With the facts laid before you in your dashboard, you will be able to provide a more personalised customer support service. Member care is a journey; it evolves as your members change.
  5. Happy Birthday: Automatic birthday wishes can be sent to every client with the gift of a special offer. For many activity providers, kids’ birthday parties are a big chunk of their income. An effective CRM system could decipher appropriate clients and send a promotional email in advance of the child’s birthday.

Budget for change

CRM systems for sports typically contain vast amounts of sensitive personal data, such as customer contact information, date of birth etc. This information increases in value over time, as a customer’s profile builds up. In its very nature, CRM is prone to General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) non-compliance. CRM budgets are expected to increase as companies follow GDPR procedures.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Like this article? there’s more where that came from.